No.9 / Top 10 lighting experiences: The Kimbell Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

April 06 2011 — by Jonathan Speirs
In my humble opinion this is Louis Kahn’s (1901-1974) seminal building where the integration of light was key, and where Kahn worked with the grandfather of lighting design, Richard Kelly (1910-1977).
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No.10 / Top 10 lighting experiences: The Milky Way

April 06 2011 — by Jonathan Speirs
Banished from much of the developed world by excessive lighting to our cities and highways, I have seen the Milky Way on several occasions, but my best experience was on an island in the Great Barrier Reef in April 2005. Apart from providing great diving, the island was a research station and one evening there was a guided star tour by one of the scientists. About twenty people showed up for this and we all lay on our backs in a large clearing, and the entire sky was filled with this amazing mass of stars – one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen.
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Light for People

February 23 2011 — by Keith Bradshaw
The subtle influence of one's inspiration upon one's work is very personal and difficult to see objectively. It shoud be of no great surpsise that inspiration for a designer working with a transient medium, such as light, can come from other transient elements such as natural light effects, cloud forms, shifting shadows and all aspects of light in a city. Less visual inspirations comes from the influence of the active or passive recipients of our 'designs with light'- People.
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‘Caravaggio - A life sacred and profane’

November 03 2010 — by Keith Bradshaw
There are few artists whose work continues to influence our contemporary visual language as Michelangelo di Caravaggio. What we would now refer to as cinematic lighting was depicted in his painted scenes: scenes aching to move, change and animate. The extremes of light and dark, commonly referred to as chiaroscuro, manage to capture atmospheres of violence, anger and a sense of stress and malevolence in equal measure to suggestions of tranquillity, excitement and eroticism. The allure of his work is that it connects us to universal feelings felt our own lives. Patchy but dependable evidence suggests that his realist technique was enhanced by the skilful use of mirrors and optics (a crude form of camera obscura) but the artistry remains in capturing the scene, forming its composition and organising its narrative. Caravaggio’s recorded history of violent drunkenness, debt and social disorder suggest a life in chaos however his work suggests a clarity and sense of purpose. In Andrew Graham-Dixon’s book ‘Caravaggio- A life sacred and profane’ Graham-Dixon explores the limited facts known of Michelangelo di Caravaggio’s real life.
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Why Dark Matters

September 30 2010 — by Mark Major
In a world keen to limit environmental damage and conserve valuable resources, learning to use less light has become increasingly pressing. Darkness – in all its various forms – is something that we must once again learn to embrace, appreciate and conserve.
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